Ways to Save in College

Going off to college is an exciting time! Your world is about to open wide, providing you with new opportunities to expand your mind, meet new people, and begin the groundwork for your career (or figure it out). One very important skill you’ll need is learning how to save while living on your own. The easy first step is finding out what you don’t need to buy.

• A printer. They take up too much space, and the cost of ink and paper can add up. Check with your college to see if they have a printer allowance (usually included in the school’s technology fee), giving you access to the school’s printers. Also, many professors prefer that you turn in your papers electronically through the school’s educational portal (e.g., Blackboard or Moodle.)

• Computer software. Most schools have special arrangements with Microsoft to provide the Office Student to their students for free. For virus software, if you have cable at home, virus software is usually available to download through the cable provider.

• Toilet papers and bathroom cleaning supplies. If you’re living in a dorm, you won’t need these products. But if you’re living in a suite style dorm with its own bathroom, check with the school to see if room and board fees include janitorial services.

• Television. First of all, with classes, homework, and studying, you’ll have very little free time to watch TV. Second, your laptop will be able to stream most of your favorite shows. Third, most colleges have TVs in common rooms.

• Ironing board and iron. They take up too much space and you’ll likely use it…maybe never. If wrinkled clothes really bother you, get a small steamer instead.

• A car. You’re going to spend most of your time on campus, so there’s little reason to pay for monthly loan payments, parking fees, gas, and insurance. Use public transportation or a bike to get to places too far to walk.

Another way to save is to keep track of small expenses, like eating out or buying cigarettes. Those expenses add up over time. For instance, just buying a Starbucks latte (around $4.00) every day means you’ll spend $300 on coffee in one semester! Make a budget and do your best to stick to it. It’ll make saving money much easier and make living on your own a little less stressful.

Copyright 2018 Credit Union National Association Inc. Information subject to change without notice. For use with members of a single credit union. All other rights reserved.
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Travel Hacks to Keep You Out of Harm’s Way

Traveling to new cities and countries is fun and exciting. To make sure you have a great time and only create happy memories of your adventure, keep these travel hacks in mind.

Keep important medical information on your phone.
If you have a medical condition or severe allergies, consider using an app to display this information on your phone’s lock screen. You can use the Health App if you have an iPhone or Medical ID if you have an Android. This is especially helpful if you’re traveling alone.

Have a room reserved for your first day
Some people like to travel spontaneously, pulling into towns with no idea where they’ll stay. But what if there’s a special event going on and all the hotels are full? Prepare ahead of time and make sure you have somewhere to spend the night when you arrive. And don’t skimp too much – you’ll probably be tired the first day and not feel at your best, so choose a place that has good security and amenities.

Be willing to spend when you don’t feel safe
What if you did reserve a place to stay and your Airbnb rental or motel turns out to be in a neighborhood that doesn’t make you feel safe? Grab a cab and head to hotel or motel in a safer area for the night. The next day, look for something in your price range and stay there for the remainder of your stay. Saving a few dollars by lodging in an unsafe area is not worth the risk.

Be aware of your surroundings
Always be aware of your surroundings and keep your belongings close to you. Also, if you drink alcohol, drink responsibly. A drunk person is easy to rob or worse.

Hide cash in your shoe
If your wallet gets lost or is stolen, having a $50 or $100 in your shoe can be a lifesaver. Without a debit or credit card, you’ll have a difficult time getting food or even getting back to your hotel. The cash will help you get through the night until credit unions are open the following day.

Don’t keep all valuables in one place
Split up your cash, credit cards, and hotel keys so they’re not all in one wallet or purse. Put some in a pocket or money belt. That way, if you are robbed, you can hand over the wallet without losing everything.

Copyright 2018 Credit Union National Association Inc. Information subject to change without notice. For use with members of a single credit union. All other rights reserved.

Homemade Dog Treats Recipe

Did you know that August 26th is Dog Appreciation Day?
We know how much your pooch means to so many, so we just had to share this!


Do you love your dog as if it were your own child? What better way to show your love than to make your furry baby some homemade treats? In addition to being cheaper than store-bought treats, your homemade treats will be healthier and so much tastier.

Try this quick and easy recipe for Peanut Butter Dog Treats.

Ingredients
2 cups flour
½ cup plain peanut butter (make sure it doesn’t have the sweetener Xylitol)
2 eggs
¼ water

Instructions
Preheat oven to 350° F.
In a large bowl, mix flour, peanut butter, and eggs.
Add water a little at a time until the mixture forms a soft dough.
Roll out your dough to about ¼ inch thick.
Cut out shapes using cookie cutters or a thick shot glass.
Transfer cookies to a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes or until the bottoms are a little dark.
Let them cool for about an hour until they’re hard as crackers.

Copyright 2018 Credit Union National Association Inc. Information subject to change without notice. For use with members of a single credit union. All other rights reserved.